Wayland, Massachusetts Town Info - bb903932.rlsplatform.com

Wayland, Massachusetts Town Information

Wayland is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 13,444 at the 2010 census.

For geographic and demographic information on Cochituate, which is part of Wayland, please see the article Cochituate, Massachusetts.

History

Wayland was the first settlement of Sudbury Plantation in 1639. The Town of East Sudbury was incorporated on April 10, 1780, on land which had formerly been part of Sudbury. On March 11, 1835, East Sudbury became Wayland, a farming community, presumably in honor of Dr. Francis Wayland, who was president of Brown University and a friend of East Sudbury’s Judge Edward Mellen. Both Wayland and Mellen became benefactors of the town’s library, the first free public library in the state.

The Wayland Free Public Library was established in 1848 and is arguably the first in Massachusetts The building was rebuilt in 1900, and is a landmark in the town of Wayland.

In 2010, Boston Duck Tours was asked to help transport flood victims in Wayland. Torrential rains had left Pelham Island area of Wayland isolated and the Ducks were brought in to ferry people in and out of their neighborhood until the waters receded.

The Wayland display server protocol is named after the town.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 15.9 square miles (41 km2), of which 15.2 square miles (39 km2) is land and 0.7 square miles (1.8 km2), or 4.21%, is water. Wayland borders Lincoln, Sudbury, Weston, Framingham, and Natick.

Demographics

As of the census of 2010, there were 13,444 people, 4,808 households, and 3,676 families residing in the town. The population density was 859.9 people per square mile (332.1/km²). There were 5,021 housing units at an average density of 310.8 per square mile (120.0/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 87.2% White, 0.9% African American, 0.0% Native American, 9.9% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.4% of the population.

As of 2000, there were 4,625 households out of which 41.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.5% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.5% were non-families. 16.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the town, the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 3.4% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $121,036, and the median income for a family was $204,033.47. Males had a median income of $136,344 versus $60,875 for females. The per capita income for the town was $75,144. About 2.1% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 2.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education

  • Claypit Hill School
  • Happy Hollow School
  • Loker School
  • Wayland High School
  • Wayland Middle School

Notable residents

  • Robert Anastas, former hockey coach and teacher who founded SADD chapter at Wayland High School following the 1981 deaths of two students in drunk driving accidents
  • Sammy Adams, rapper
  • Carter Schultz and David Von Mering, 2011 high school graduates and partners is the now broken-up rap duo, Aer
  • Amar Bose, founder of Bose Corporation, a company that specializes in high-quality sound systems
  • David Blair, independent electronic cinema director
  • Lydia Maria Child, 19th-century American abolitionist, novelist, journalist, author of "Over the River and Through the Woods"
  • Glenn Cooper Internationally best-selling thriller writer and film producer
  • Archibald Cox, legal scholar, Special Prosecutor of the Watergate Scandal involving President Nixon's Administration
  • David Hackett Fischer, Brandeis Professor of History and author
  • Tom Hamilton, bass player for Aerosmith
  • Josiah Johnson Hawes, pioneering 19th-century photographer
  • Beatrice Herford, actress
  • Thomas Kiefer, rower in the 1984 Olympics
  • Joyce Kulhawik, arts and entertainment anchor for WBZ-TV News in Boston
  • Daniel Lopatin, experimental musician better known as Oneohtrix Point Never
  • Allen Morgan, founder and first executive director of Sudbury Valley Trustees
  • Johnny Most, the radio voice of the Boston Celtics
  • Tim Murphy, head coach of the Harvard football team
  • Alvaro Pascual-Leone, noted neuroscientist
  • Peter Rowan, bluegrass musician
  • Harold Russell, Academy Award winner for his role as a disabled World War II vet in 1946's The Best Years of Our Lives
  • Scott Levin, anchor WGRZ-TV Buffalo, multiple Emmy & Edward R. Murrow winner
  • Alberto Salazar, marathon runner
  • Taylor Schilling, actress and star of the NBC hospital drama Mercy as well as the 2012 movie The Lucky One and the Netflix original drama-comedy series Orange is the New Black.
  • Tom Scholz, guitarist for 1970s rock group Boston; their debut album was recorded in his basement in Wayland.
  • Edmund Sears, 1800s Unitarian parish minister, author who wrote a number of theological works influential to his contemporary liberal Protestants, famous for penning the words to "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear".
  • Mary Sears, Oceanographer
  • Sarah Sewall, lecturer
  • Ryan Sypek, actor and star of the TV series Wildfire
  • Andy Teich, CEO, FLIR Systems Inc
  • Steven Tyler, member of Aerosmith, who held the first and only rock concert in the Wayland High School field house before the band became known worldwide
  • Gladys Widdiss, tribal historian and potter, President of the Aquinnah Wampanoag of Gay Head from 1978 until 1987
  • Courtney Yates, Two time Survivor contestant

See also

Dudley Pond, Cochituate

References

Further reading

  • 1871 Atlas of Massachusetts. by Wall & Gray. Map of Massachusetts. Map of Middlesex County.
  • History of Middlesex County, Massachusetts, Volume 1 (A-H), Volume 2 (L-W) compiled by Samuel Adams Drake, published 1879-1880. 572 and 505 pages. Wayland article by Rev. Josiah H. Temple in volume 2 pages 506-511.

External links

  • Official website
  • Wayland Public Schools
  • WaylandeNews
  • Wayland Town Crier
  • Wayland Business Association
  • Wayland Transparency
  • Wayland Voters Network

Source: Wikipedia

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