Kathy Kelley | Wellesley Real Estate, Natick Real Estate, Needham Real Estate, Weston Real Estate


This Condo in Newton, MA recently sold for $1,450,000. This Townhouse style home was sold by Kathy Kelley - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Town and Country Real Estate.


31 Beecher Pl, Newton, MA 02459

Condo

$1,475,000
Price
$1,450,000
Sale Price

11
Rooms
5
Beds
3/1
Full/Half Baths
Get the fire pit ready for socially distant cocktails on the beautiful private patio and adjoining deck at this young and spacious townhouse. Nearly 4000 sq ft of living space from the third floor with potential au pair suite to the fully finished lower level. Open concept floor plan with high ceilings, tall windows and space for all activities: gym, office, up to 5 bedrooms, playroom and media room. Enjoy this summer social distance entertaining on the large brick patio and deck with Sunsetter style awning. All the outdoor spaces are privately surrounded by trees, fence and beautiful perennial gardens. There is even a lawn area for play. Mornings can start with coffee on the second floor balcony, a peaceful spot to begin the day. All this and a 2-car garage in super convenient neighborhood where you can walk to Wegman's and the Chestnut Hill Mall. Don’t miss the home with all the spaces your family needs to be together. Or apart! Quick closing possible.

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This Single-Family in Wellesley, MA recently sold for $2,000,000. This Colonial style home was sold by Kathy Kelley - Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Town and Country Real Estate.


40 Boulder Brook Rd, Wellesley, MA 02481

Single-Family

$1,949,000
Price
$2,000,000
Sale Price

10
Rooms
5
Beds
4/2
Full/Half Baths
Welcome to this beautiful colonial in Wellesley's beloved neighborhood. Gracious sized rooms, high ceilings and natural light is apparent throughout the home. The main level features sun splashed living room and dining room. A large eat -in kitchen with island, custom built-ins, pantry and stainless steel appliances which opens into a spacious family room with fireplace and custom built-ins. A home office and well designed mudroom complete the first floor. The second floor offers a gracious master suite complete with fireplace and en-suite marble bath with soaking tub. There are also three additional large bedrooms and two baths plus laundry room. A fifth bedroom with an en-suite bath and additional storage complete the third floor. The expansive lower level has an exercise room, play room, full bath plus storage. Block party neighborhood! Close to Boulder Brook reservation and trails as well as path to Bates Elementary School.

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In some instances, a home seller has limited time and resources to list his or her house and promote it to prospective buyers. Fortunately, there are many ways for a seller to make the most of his or her time and resources throughout the property selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a house seller get the most out of his or her time and resources.

1. Create a Plan

A home selling strategy can make a world of difference for any seller, at any time. Because if a seller knows what to expect after he or she lists a residence, this individual can plan accordingly.

As you put together a home selling strategy, think about your property selling goals. Then, you can determine the steps you'll need to take to achieve these goals – something that may help you streamline the house selling journey.

2. Learn About Your Target Audience

Consider the buyer's perspective – you'll be glad you did. If you understand why buyers may consider your residence, you can ensure your home listing hits the mark with them. And as a result, you could boost your chances of enjoying a fast, profitable home selling experience.

Don't forget to analyze your home's strengths and weaknesses too. Oftentimes, it is beneficial for a seller to conduct a house inspection before he or she lists a residence. With an inspection report in hand, a seller can identify any underlying home problems and correct these issues before they can slow down a potential home sale.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

If you need help to sell your home, you can always hire a real estate agent. There are many qualified real estate agents available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals will do everything possible to ensure you can optimize your time and resources throughout the house selling journey.

A real estate agent understands the home selling journey varies from person to person. As such, he or she first will meet with you and find out why you are selling your residence. Next, a real estate agent will provide a personalized home selling strategy. A real estate agent then will promote your residence to prospective buyers, host home showings and open house events and much more.

Of course, if you receive an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent is ready to help you determine the best course of action as well. Performing an in-depth analysis of a homebuying proposal sometimes can be difficult, but a real estate agent is happy to help you make an informed home selling decision.

For those who are looking to achieve the best-possible results during the property selling journey, it generally is beneficial to explore ways to maximize your time and resources. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you'll be better equipped than ever before to use your time and resources to enjoy a quick, successful home selling experience.


Image by Zach Schorr from Pixabay

Whether you’re buying or selling a home, you might discover there is an easement attached to your property. If so, you’re probably wondering how this affects your property values.

What is an Easement?

In a nutshell, an easement is for one person to have explicit permission to have use of another person’s property for a specified purpose. There are three general types of easements: gross, appurtenant and prescriptive. Each has specific rights attached to them and the rights could be for either a private (i.e. allowing someone access or use) or public purpose (i.e. utility companies). Easements can be temporary or permanent; with the latter, the easement is typically written into the property deed.

It’s important to know, while easements permit others to use your land for a designated reason, it doesn’t grant anyone using your land any rights to ownership; you are sole owner.

Can Easements Affect Property Values?

Easements of land may or may not impact your property’s value, depending on how the land is being used and whether you want to use (or sell) your property. Many times, an easement has no impact on your property’s value. However, there are potential issues that may crop up when looking to develop or sell your land which could impact its perceived value.

  • Easements might limit the ability to build structures on affected portions of the land.
  • Resale values might be impacted by structures, wires, pipes, etc. placed by utility companies, especially if they are unsightly or prevent owners from developing the land for personal purposes.
  • Buyers might not like the idea of others “trespassing” on their land, even if being done legally.
  • On the other hand, some easement holders pay a fee to the property owner, and collecting this money might be an attractive prospect to some buyers.
  • In many neighborhoods, everyone has the same easement attached to their property. In these cases, it doesn’t typically impact your property value because the easements affect everyone’s property equally.

    Is There a Way to Remove an Easement?

    A court of law often considers an easement to be used in perpetuity unless a stipulation exists in the original agreement of how long the easement will last. In some cases, easements can be removed.

  • A written agreement is made with the easement holder to terminate the easement (easier if the original purpose of using the land is abandoned or no longer valid).
  • If easements are no longer used or needed, inquire if a title action can be taken to reset property lines, eliminating the existing easement.
  • Ask the current easement holder if they are willing to abandon use and let it naturally expire—there will need to be proof this has occurred for the easement to be removed.
  • Consult with a real estate attorney who is well-versed in both general and state-specific easement laws—there may be lesser-known “outs” for easements according to local laws.
  • If you do successfully terminate an easement, be sure it’s recorded in public records.

    While technically an easement doesn’t devalue your property, it can affect its marketability. This is always something to consider when determining to willfully grant an easement or buy a home that has an easement attached to its property deed.


    Image by mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

    Most homebuyers take out a mortgage when they purchase a house, and there are several different types of mortgages to choose from. Here are some of the more common mortgage options and the benefits of each one.

    Conventional 30-Year Fixed Mortgages

    Perhaps the standard starting point for a mortgage is the conventional 30-year fixed home loan. This mortgage is underwritten by a private lending institution but conforms to standards set forth by federal programs. The terms of the loan last for 30 years, and the interest rate is fixed so that it doesn’t change throughout this period.

    A conventional 30-year fixed mortgage is a good option for many homebuyers. It lets you spread out the cost of a house across three decades, and you know what the interest and payments will be for the full duration of the loan.

    Conventional 15-Year Fixed Mortgages

    Conventional 15-year fixed mortgages are just like their 30-year counterparts, except these last half as long. Because the duration of these mortgages is half as long, homebuyers end up paying a lot less in interest.

    You’ll have to pay more per month if you cram your mortgage into 15 years, but the interest savings are substantial. If you can afford higher monthly payments, this option will end up saving you a lot.

    Adjustable-Rate Mortgages

    Adjustable-rate mortgages come in various durations, just as fixed-rate mortgages do. The difference between the two is that the interest rate on an adjustable-rate mortgage can adjust. The interest rate is set according to an index, and as the index changes so does the interest rate on the loan. Which index is used and how adjustments are made are detailed in the paperwork of a loan.

    Most adjustable-rate mortgages come with lower initial interest rates than fixed-rate mortgages offer, although the rates on adjustable mortgages can end up being much higher. If you can financially manage an increase in your mortgage’s interest rate, this option might be a way to save a little bit of interest (although there is risk involved).

    Guaranteed Mortgages

    The federal government offers several guaranteed mortgage options for qualifying individuals. Some of the most common ones are VA and FHA guaranteed home loans. 

    In these programs, the government guarantees a mortgage if the homebuyer fails to make their payments. This reduces the risk to the lender, and many lenders relax their qualification requirements as a result.

    If you can’t get a conventional mortgage and qualify for a federally guaranteed program, one of these could help you attain the dream of home ownership.




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