Kathy Kelley | Wellesley Real Estate, Natick Real Estate, Needham Real Estate, Weston Real Estate


As you get ready to add your house to the real estate market, you likely will consider high and low initial asking prices. However, it is important to remember that no two residences are exactly alike. And much in the same vein, the initial asking price for your home may vary from that of a similar residence based on your house's condition, age and other factors.

Ultimately, a diligent home seller will allocate the necessary time and resources to determine a competitive initial asking price for his or her residence. This seller will be able to establish an initial home asking price that hits the mark with buyers, and as a result, stir up plenty of interest in his or her house.

Determining the ideal initial home asking price may seem tough at first. Fortunately, we're here to help you set a competitive price for your residence, regardless of the current housing market's conditions.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you establish the ideal initial asking price for your residence.

1. Assess Your Home

The present condition of your house may have a major impact on its value. Thus, you should perform a home inspection before you list your house to identify any underlying problems and address such issues.

A home inspection is generally requested by a buyer after a seller accepts an offer on a residence. Conversely, a seller who wants to go above and beyond the call of duty may perform an inspection to take a proactive approach to home improvement projects. This approach may help a seller mitigate potential home problems before they are discovered later in the home selling process.

Thanks to a home inspection, a seller can establish home improvement priorities. Then, this seller can perform myriad home improvements and move closer to maximizing the value of his or her residence.

2. Evaluate the Housing Market

Operating in a seller's market is far different from selling a house in a buyer's market. If you review the real estate market, you can gain the insights you need to establish a competitive price for your home.

Take a look at the prices of houses in your area that are similar to your own residence. This information will enable you to understand the price range for comparable houses in your city or town.

Also, evaluate the prices of recently sold residences in your area. This housing sector data will allow you to determine whether you are operating in a buyer's or seller's market.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent knows the ins and outs of selling a home in any housing market. He or she can offer a wide assortment of housing market data. Perhaps most important, a real estate agent will make it simple for you to establish a competitive price for your residence and reap the benefits of a fast, profitable home selling experience.

Want to add your house to the real estate market? Use the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble setting a competitive initial asking price for your house.



 Photo by RawPixel via Pixabay

It may be tempting to call an expert (and sometimes, you can't avoid doing so) to fix something or to enhance the decor of your home, but some projects are surprisingly easy to do. Tackling DIY projects at home has never been easier, thanks to the availability of tools and products designed just for homeowners. You won't have to pay contractor's rates -- and can have a custom look you'll love -- when you try one or more of these projects. 

Upgrade your Shower: Get an immediate boost to your shower when you swap out the old shower head for something new. Removing the old head and adding a fancy new one -- whether you want something adjustable or a spa-worthy rain shower. You won't need many tools and can remove the old head, clean things up, then add the new one in about an hour. You'll love the satisfaction that comes from doing this yourself, and be able to buy a more expensive shower head without blowing your budget, too. 

Paint a Room: Leave the cathedral ceilings and complicated spaces to a pro, but if you just need a quick color change in a bedroom, you can generally DIY it for about a quarter of the cost of hiring someone to do it. Expect to spend several hours over the course of the weekend and invest the savings into quality equipment and paint you'll never have to touch up or worry about. 

Prepare the Garden: Shoveling out a 10x10 space sounds less than appealing to most of us, but you can rent a tiller from a local home improvement store and DIY this space in under an hour. You'll be able to focus instead on the planning and planting -- not the grueling digging -- when you take this approach. If you can push a lawnmower, you can use a tiller to prepare any area for planting in a hurry. 

Assemble Furniture: You can hire someone to do it, or pay a fee for the store to assemble things, but if you have some spare time and a few tools, most items can go together very swiftly. Use the time to binge watch a new program and DIY the assembly. You'll save money and get the satisfaction that comes from knowing you can do things yourself. 

Powerwash: There are many powerwasher brands on the market today that offer a lot of cleaning for a small price. A contractor could charge you hundreds of dollars each time you need the service, or you can spend about a hundred one time and get a unit of your own. These smaller, more compact models still pack plenty of punch and can be used for decks, porches, patios and on your home itself with ease. 

Simple projects like these build your skills and your inventory of supplies and tools. If you have a project in mind that can be safely done, it is worth exploring your DIY options -- you could end up leanring something new and creating a finished look you'll love. 

 


Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

If you've recently made the decision to put your home on the market in the near future, you're probably already aware that the Millennial generation has a reputation for being a bit different from their counterparts of the past. For instance, you may have heard that this generation is putting off home ownership longer than any of their predecessors and that they've got quirky requirements such as walkable urban locations. Although you can't help where your home is situated, there are other things you can do to make your home more attractive to Millennials. Here's what you can do:

Create a Low Maintenance Yard

Although many Millennials have discovered the joy of gardening, their efforts are going more to growing at least some of their own food rather than maintaining a fussy ornamental landscape. Vast lawns don't appeal to them, and neither do high-maintenance trees and shrubbery. Consider replacing much of your lawn with a low-maintenance rock garden and eliminating any feature that requires significant time and attention.

Create an Appealing Online Presence

Millennial Buyers are far more likely to decide to view specific properties as the result of gaining a favorable impression of them online than seeing them listed in a newspaper or in a real estate agent's brochure. You'll need professional quality photographs to show off your home in its best light online, but don't stop there -- Millennials want to see videos as well. 

Create a Home Office 

A designated home office is another feature that won't fail to appeal to Millennial buyers. Many of them spend at least part of their time working from home, so if you don't already have a designated home office, consider converting one of the bedrooms to one. Choose a room with plenty of natural lighting if possible. 

Create Energy Efficiency

Eco-conscious Millennials appreciate energy efficiency because it's compatible with their principles, but because their idealism is tempered with a pragmatic side, they also appreciate the cost-savings involved with energy efficient features. Consider having solar panels, on-demand hot water heaters, or other green features installed. 

Create a Smart Home

As the first generation completely raised in the digital age, many Millennials consider smart home technology to be more of a necessity than a luxury. Temperature modulation, security, and lighting are three of the most common in-home smart technologies, but they can also be used to water the lawn and garden area, activate laundry machines, and put cleaning robots to work. 

It's also a good idea to be prepared to speak at some length with Millennials come to see your home about the quality and availability of WiFi service. Remembering that their generation may have different needs and preferences than you will help ensure smooth sailing after you put your home on the market. 


In some instances, a home seller has limited time and resources to list his or her house and promote it to prospective buyers. Fortunately, there are many ways for a seller to make the most of his or her time and resources throughout the property selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a house seller get the most out of his or her time and resources.

1. Create a Plan

A home selling strategy can make a world of difference for any seller, at any time. Because if a seller knows what to expect after he or she lists a residence, this individual can plan accordingly.

As you put together a home selling strategy, think about your property selling goals. Then, you can determine the steps you'll need to take to achieve these goals – something that may help you streamline the house selling journey.

2. Learn About Your Target Audience

Consider the buyer's perspective – you'll be glad you did. If you understand why buyers may consider your residence, you can ensure your home listing hits the mark with them. And as a result, you could boost your chances of enjoying a fast, profitable home selling experience.

Don't forget to analyze your home's strengths and weaknesses too. Oftentimes, it is beneficial for a seller to conduct a house inspection before he or she lists a residence. With an inspection report in hand, a seller can identify any underlying home problems and correct these issues before they can slow down a potential home sale.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

If you need help to sell your home, you can always hire a real estate agent. There are many qualified real estate agents available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals will do everything possible to ensure you can optimize your time and resources throughout the house selling journey.

A real estate agent understands the home selling journey varies from person to person. As such, he or she first will meet with you and find out why you are selling your residence. Next, a real estate agent will provide a personalized home selling strategy. A real estate agent then will promote your residence to prospective buyers, host home showings and open house events and much more.

Of course, if you receive an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent is ready to help you determine the best course of action as well. Performing an in-depth analysis of a homebuying proposal sometimes can be difficult, but a real estate agent is happy to help you make an informed home selling decision.

For those who are looking to achieve the best-possible results during the property selling journey, it generally is beneficial to explore ways to maximize your time and resources. Thanks to the aforementioned tips, you'll be better equipped than ever before to use your time and resources to enjoy a quick, successful home selling experience.


The number one factor that affects the length of time a house remains on the market is curb appeal. That's the consensus of real estate professionals across the country, and was documented in a recent study by a well-known real estate website.

So if it's such a high priority, then why do a lot of homeowners skimp on that aspect of preparing their home for a fast sale? Sometimes it's a lack of awareness; other times it may be a lack of money. In extreme cases, it can be quite pricey to transform a home from "shabby" to "exquisite!" That's an unusual scenario, though, and in most cases the cost of enhancing your home's curb appeal should be both affordable and cost effective.

Where to Begin

The ideal visual (and visceral) effect you want to achieve can be summed up in ten words: fresh, well cared for, aesthetically pleasing, manicured, meticulous, updated, and clean. Perhaps a more concise way to describe the image you want to project to potential buyers is "pride of ownership." Once you're conveying that impression, people are going to make positive assumptions about the value and condition of your home. While it's not necessary that the front of your property and home look perfect in every imaginable way, it is important to pay attention to small details and overall impressions.

Some homeowners will see this goal as an overwhelming challenge, but it doesn't have to be. The first hurdle is to take care of the basics, such as making sure your lawn always looks freshly mowed and that there's no signs of peeling or faded paint on your home and garage. Pulling weeds, placing a few colorful hanging flower baskets in strategic locations, and trimming overgrown bushes and trees are also effective ways to make your property look more desirable.

An advantage of working with a seasoned real estate agent is that they can quickly size up the outside appearance of your home, and make cost-effective suggestions of ways to improve curb appeal and increase the attractiveness of your property. When it comes to selling your house in the shortest period of time, first impressions are vitally important.

One helpful tactic for getting your house noticed by house hunters and real estate agents is to take a walk (or drive) in your neighborhood to see how your curb appeal stacks up to other homes for sale in the area. Ideally, you want your home to look at least as good, if not better, than other nearby properties. Since potential buyers may be focusing their search on specific neighborhoods, such as yours, you'll be giving yourself more of an "inside track" in the real estate market by making sure your home compares favorably to others in the immediate area -- both inside and out.




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